The current boathouse at 3800 Minnesota Avenue is old and literally falling into Superior Bay.

The current boathouse at 3800 Minnesota Avenue is old and literally falling into Superior Bay.

The need is now.

The sport of rowing is growing in popularity across the country with the publication of the bestseller, Boys in the Boat. However, the continuation of Duluth’s thriving rowing program is threatened by an aging boathouse. Having survived World Wars and the Depression, the Club must build a new home to secure its future. The current boathouse—a former dance hall at 3800 Minnesota Avenue on Park Point—is old and literally falling into Superior Bay. Winter ice floes shift the foundation further every year, while storms off Lake Superior rattle the walls.

The current boathouse can’t keep up with modern rowing programs.

The boathouse is far too small. Locker rooms are tiny. The repair shop is tucked into a corner. Each time a boat is taken in and out of the boathouse, rowers must navigate the delicate racing shells around tight corners. Boats are jammed into every nook, with many strung up by pulleys into the rafters. Storage is so limited that nearly a third of the shells must be kept outside in the summer, exposed to harsh elements. The facility can’t meet the demands of the Club’s popular and ever-growing Juniors program.

A new boathouse is essential for the continuation of the Duluth Rowing Club.

For decades, the Club has managed to keep the boathouse functional with volunteer maintenance. But the Club is losing its battle against time and building decay. Eventually, the dilapidated boathouse will no longer be functional and the Club will be without a home.

Rowing has given me friends, health, and taught me all the life lessons: responsibility, teamwork, and the importance of working hard.”
Hans Slade, College and junior rower


CONTINUE LEARNING MORE: Introducing the Duluth Rowing Center.